Unit 1: The Things We Carry: Fostering Emotional Literacy to Benefit the Collective

This unit will be an introductory exploration of the key concepts and the analytical tools we will use to deconstruct American society in terms of class, race and gender.  We will read Tim O’Brien’s acclaimed novel, The Things They Carried and apply it to the things we carry that affect not only how we build our community within CORE this year, but also how we cultivate relationships in our lives outside of school. To more fully understand our relationships to each other, we must understand how we are socialized and how we can begin to build relationships where love, dialogue, and openness to grow replace fear, ignorance, and insecurity.  During this unit there is a writing workshop to continue the process of developing the foundational skills required for critical analysis and expression.

Literature Workshop

After reading Tim O’Brien’s Vietnam War novel, The Things They Carried, during the summer, this workshop will provide a deeper analysis of the novel itself as well as elements of postmodern literature. Students will examine the “things” the soldiers carry in order to uncover the physical and psychological  baggage of both the Vietnam War and the “war of the living.”

LEARN MORE ABOUT THIS WORKSHOP

After reading Tim O’Brien’s Vietnam War novel, The Things They Carried, during the summer, this workshop will provide a deeper analysis of the novel itself as well as elements of postmodern literature. The topic of war will be explored through O’Brien’s use of multiple perspectives and “story truth”. Students will also examine the “things” the soldiers carry in order to uncover the physical and psychological baggage of both the Vietnam War and the “war of the living”.

Readings:

The Things They Carried, Tim O’Brien

Film:

Alive Day, HBO Films

Key Concepts:

Postmodernism
Happening Truth
Story Truth
Multiple Perspectives
Coping Mechanisms
Guilt

Writing Workshop

Continuing with the theme of “the things we carry,” often students carry feelings about essay writing that hinders emerging writers from fulfilling their potential. In this workshop, we will develop the foundational skills required for critical analysis and expression through writing.

LEARN MORE ABOUT THIS WORKSHOP

The sociology workshop serves as the foundation of the study of oppression for the remaining units throughout the year. This workshop explores the “power over” dynamic that our institutions and relationships are based on. To more fully understand our relationships to each other, we must understand how we are socialized and how we can begin to build relationships where love, dialogue, and openness to grow replace fear, ignorance, and insecurity.

Readings:

Excerpts from USC’s Writing 101 Handbook and The Little Brown Book

Film:

Good Will Hunting

Key Concepts:

The Writing Process
Summary, Context, Analysis, and Evidence
Syntax
Diction
Sentence and Word Variety
Run-Ons/Fragments
Agreement
Passive vs. Active Voice
Academic Integrity
Plagiarism

Sociology Workshop

The sociology workshop serves as the foundation of the study of oppression for the remaining units throughout the year.

LEARN MORE ABOUT THIS WORKSHOP

The sociology workshop serves as the foundation of the study of oppression for the remaining units throughout the year. This workshop explores the “power over” dynamic that our institutions and relationships are based on. To more fully understand our relationships to each other, we must understand how we are socialized and how we can begin to build relationships where love, dialogue, and openness to grow replace fear, ignorance, and insecurity.

Readings:

“Cycle of Socialization,” Bobbie Haro
“A Culture of Fear,” Parker Palmer
“Nature of Power,” Starhawk
“Partnership/Domination Continuum,” Riane Eisler
“Cycle of Liberation,” Bobbie Haro

Film:

The Matrix

Key Concepts:

Social identity vs. individual identity
Cycle of Socialization
Socialization of fears
Power Over, Power With and Power Within
Liberation

Visual/Performing Arts Workshop

Too often the idea of group work is negative. That is most likely because we have experienced working in a dysfunctional group when one or two members do all the work or one person does little work and jeopardizes the group’s grade. It is not easy to be forced to rely on others for a personal grade. However, in today’s workplace it is essential to work with others for a common goal. Therefore, a major component of the first semester of eleventh grade is working in task groups.

LEARN MORE ABOUT THIS WORKSHOP

Task Group Orientation

Too often the idea of group work is negative. That is most likely because we have experienced working in a dysfunctional group when one or two members do all the work or one person does little work and jeopardizes the group’s grade. It is not easy to be forced to rely on others for a personal grade. However, in today’s workplace it is essential to work with others for a common goal. Therefore, a major component of the first semester of eleventh grade is working in task groups. This workshop introduces you to your task group for the entire semester and begins the process of learning theories and practices useful in creating more effective and harmonious groups.

Readings:

“The Artistry of Teaching For, With, and About Multiple Intelligences,” adapted from Howard Gardner’s Frames of Mind: The Theory of Multiple Intelligences
“When Smart is Dumb: The Nature of Emotional Intelligence,” adapted from Daniel Goleman’s Emotional Intelligence
“Pilgrimmage to Nonviolence,” adapted from Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Nonviolence in America: A Documentary History
“Clarity: Give Love Words,” All About Love, bell hooks

Key Concepts:

Defining Intelligence
Value of Cooperative Learning
Utilization of Multiple Intelligences
Importance of Emotional Intelligence
Understanding the Task Group Process
Process vs. Product
Multiple Perspectives
Defining Love